Most Remote Islands In The World, Tristan da Cunha Geography of Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean Image credit: NASA ASTER volcano archive jpl Pin It

Most Remote Islands In The World, Tristan da Cunha

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The island of Tristan da Cunha is the most remote islands in the world and one of the most isolated places in the world.
Tristan de Cunha is an archipelago of small islands located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. There are a few other islands in the archipelago, all uninhabited: Inaccessible Island, Nightingale Island, Middle Island and Stoltenhoff Island. Gough Island, some 300km away, hosts a weather and scientific research outpost.

Where is Tristan da Cunha

Tristan da Cunha lies in the middle of the southern Atlantic

Tristan da Cunha lies in the middle of the southern Atlantic

Most remote inhabited island on earth

The nearest speck of land, St. Helena, is a whopping 2,430km away, and it’s 2,816 kilometers (1,750 mi) miles to the nearest continent, Africa and 3,360 kilometers (2,088 mi) away from South America. The island has a permanent population of 275 (in 2009). There are 80 families on the island, but they share only 8 surnames. The main settlement is “Edinburgh of the Seven Seas” (known locally as “The Settlement”)

Despite its tiny size and astonishing isolation, Tristan de Cunha has enjoyed a rich history. The first permanent settler was Jonathan Lambert, from Salem, Massachusetts, United States, who arrived at the islands in December 1810 with two other men. A small group of British, Italian, and American settlers lived on the island in the 1800s, and it is still under the U.K.’s jurisdiction today but it administered by the government of St Helena, which lies several hundred miles to the north. Tristan da Cunha is part of the British overseas territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha.

Read also: Isles of Scilly – Subtropical British Archipelago

The islands were first discovered in 1506 by Portuguese explorer Tristão da Cunha. He named the main island after himself, Ilha de Tristão da Cunha, which was anglicised from its earliest mention on British Admiralty charts to Tristan da Cunha Island.

During World War II, the island was used as a top-secret Royal Navy weather and radio station. In the following years Tristan da Cunha had several newsworthy events: – The United States tested an atomic bomb nearby in 1958, a volcanic eruption in 1961 forced an evacuation of the entire population for several years, and in 2001 the island was hit by a 120 mph cyclone.

Read also: Alert – Northernmost Permanently Inhabited Place

Travel to Tristan da Cunha

When you have the title as the most isolated islands in the world, transport to the outside world is difficult. There are no airport, so the islands can be reached only by sea. Fishing boats from South Africa service the islands 8-9 times a year.

Traveling to Tristan da Cunha requires careful planning. It takes five to six days to travel the 2,810 kilometers from Cape Town. The South African polar research ship SA Agulhas and the fishing vessels Edinburgh and Baltic Trader do the voyage between Cape Town and Tristan da Cunha several times every year. A return ticket on Agulhas is about US$1300, a return ticket on one of the fishing vessels is US$800.
Schedules and further information is available on the official Tristan da Cunha website.

Tristan da Cunha facts

How big is Tristan da Cunha : The main island is 98 km2 where the capital Edinburgh of the Seven Seas is located.
What is the population of Tristan da Cunha : 264 (2010 census)
Where is Tristan da Cunha : South Atlantic Ocean, between the two continents Africa and South America

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Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

It takes nearly a week to move to Tristan da Cunha from Cape Town.

Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

The trips cost 800 Dollars by the fishing vessel, and 1,300 Dollars by the ship.

Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

The trips cost 800 Dollars by the fishing vessel, and 1,300 Dollars by the ship.

Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

The National Geographic explorer moored off Tristan da Cunha settlement.

Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

It’s a long way from anywhere!.

Tristan da Cunha Map

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